Slender Incident and SMILE.dream

A few years ago, my family (dad, step mom, and siblings) and I moved to a new house. I loved it at first. It was fun. But then I got my own room in the house and I realizes that something is off about the house, or something in it. One night I had an incident that I call the slender incident. After that I felt like an evil presence was in the house (mostly my room). After a while I started getting into creepypastas, even though I hated being scared. Recently I had a dream while in my room I call SMILE.dream. It started out fine but then suddenly changed from happy to disturbing. in the dream I saw a pic of the creepypasta smile.jpg. But it wasn’t like any you have ever seen on the internet. After a while big gray letters spelled jpg and I was back in my room. I was paralyzed and a short dark figure was teleporting in my room while swaying side to side very fast. Once he touched me I woke up but was still paralyzed for a bit. Call me crazy but I swear something is our to get me

average-white-american-mother

chibiusaidwhat asked:

so what's the appropriate terms to use instead of 'oriental'? and why is 'oriental' considered as racist and offensive? I thought it was a common term since it's widely used

thisisnotjapan answered:

From Ellen Oh- 

Please don’t call me Oriental

The other day an old man made a comment to me that my oriental children were well mannered. I said thank you and tried not to let the oriental comment bother me. After all, he is from a different generation where oriental was the correct term to use for Asians. But it got me to thinking about the word and why it bothered me and I started doing some research and stumbled upon a forum with over 10 pages of back and forth on why it was insulting or why it was ridiculous. And the one comment that really upset me was when someone said “Oriental offensive? Since when did we let foreigners dictate how to use our language?”

It is a telling comment. Its roots based in the notion that Asians are foreigners. The term “oriental” comes from the “orient” which refers to the east. A term that was based on the Eurocentric belief that the Orient was a barbaric and exotic place east of Europe. It is why the word itself is considered derogatory, for it casts “orientals” as different, as foreigners. And when you think of yourself as American, being reminded that you are “foreign” hurts.

When I first started having conversations about race with my children, they would ask me if they should tell people they are Korean. I said no, you say you are American. “But I can’t say that,” my then 6 year old said. “They say I don’t look American.” I think as a parent, there are moments that just break your heart because you want to protect your children from the harsh realities of life and you find that you just can’t.

The reality is that my kids, me, my sister, my husband - we are as far from being Korean as we are from being Egyptian or Russian. We might look like a Korean and pass for one on the streets of Seoul, but as soon as we open our mouths, our Americanism pours right out. Not just in what we say or how we say it. But in how we think, walk, laugh, carry ourselves, etc. For someone to say “You’re not American because you don’t look like one.” Well then, you might as well strip us of our complete identity. It’s like every time someone shouts out “Go back to your own country!” Something inside of us dies just a little bit.

This past spring, youngest came home from kindergarten deeply upset. When I asked her what was wrong, she explained that she was sitting at lunch with 2 of her friends H and M, who are both blond and blue-eyed. Two boys were sitting across from them and were commenting on how pretty H and M are, listing how pretty their eyes were and their long hair, etc. They then turned to youngest and began to comment on how ugly she was in comparison. Youngest was devastated. I was proud of her for standing up to them. Telling them to stop or she would move to another table. When they didn’t stop, she made good on her threat and moved away. I was proud of her for taking a stand, but my heart broke for her. She asked me if she really was ugly because she didn’t have blonde hair and blue eyes. “No,” I said, “you are beautiful inside and out but some people just are blind and can’t see a diamond shining so bright in front of them. But that’s ok. It’s their loss so don’t even waste your time thinking about them.”

Even in kindergarten, children learn to recognize differences and to comment on them. While I did call the school and had the teacher have the boys apologize to youngest, can we really blame children for deep rooted societal prejudices? They told youngest she was ugly because she was different. Her eyes were different, her cheeks were different, even the one asymmetric dimple she has was different. I told her different is good. I hope she remembers that and never lets this become insecurity.

Many people complain that we’ve become so PC that we can’t say anything for fear of someone getting offended. To some extent, I agree with that and I don’t ask for people to be so careful with their words. But ultimately it isn’t the words that hurt but the intent behind them and sometimes the words themselves become synonymous with the intent. Calling someone oriental or making chinky eyes might not have been made with a racist intent, but the word and the action have become synonymous with an intent to be racist. So why use them? Yes we are different and I truly believe different is good. But when these differences are used as a way to stereotype people negatively, it becomes racism.

So please, don’t call me oriental. I am no devious, slant-eyed, exotic foreigner that speaks cryptically of ancient Chinese secrets. That stereotype needs to die. Help me kill it once and for all.

KILL IT (the stereotype) WITH FIRE!!!

average-white-american-mother
sophiedoodlz:

disneyvillainsforjustice:

smallworldofbigal:

nerdfaceangst:

myfeelsarehurting:

rjthedetective:

draelogor:

feministsupernatural:

You know what makes me the saddest about Lilo and Stitch?
When she gets kicked out of the dance class, she’s the only person we know for sure is native Hawaiian in her age bracket in the class.
There’s Myrtle, who is white, Elena who is white (f she’s the blonde one), Theresa who’s background is unclear, and Yuki who is implied, based on the name and the large Japanese population in Hawaii, to be Japanese. 
She is taking a dance class of a dance traditional to her people.
And she is kicked out primarily because a white girl, Myrtle, is bullying her. 
How fucking sad is that?

Dude.
This always got me about the movie. I always
wanted
to punch
myrtle
IN THE FACE AND EXISTENCE 

Also, the hula dancing runs in the family, as we find out in the sequel that her mother was a dance champion. It’s clear in this scene that the deaths of her mother and father are still fresh in her mind and I think the dancing reminds her of her mother and happier times. Maybe they practiced together frequently? Idk, it’s just the vibe I get. That Lilo is there to do her mother proud, rather than to make friends and socialize like the others there.

Her face says it all. Look at how happy she is!

Everyone who liked this, everyone who validated this, you need to unlike it right NOW.
As a Native Hawai’ian, I have a problem with this post.
A fucking big problem.
First off, Hawai’i is massively diverse. Massively. Almost no one is pure Hawai’ian. The speculation that Lilo is at all pure or the only part Hawai’ian is laughable. There’s a very very slim margin that she would be at all. Secondly, just because it’s “not confirmed” doesn’t mean those girls aren’t. There are thousands of Japanese-Hawai’ian girls. Thousands, and thousands more of even more mixed races who are Hawai’ian. My sister is a shade away from blonde, and as pale as snow white, and she is just as half-Hawai’ian as I am - even though I look more “authentic”. I know many beautiful Hawai’ian girls with clouds of red hair and creamy complexions from mixed bloodlines. If you want to get “authentic” and go off of Lilo’s appearance, to us locals, she looks half-Asian. She looks definitely hapa at best.
It angers me beyond all reason that this has reposts, reposts from people who don’t understand the Native Hawai’ian culture, much less the culture that sprung from it which envelops our islands. You are reposting blind ignorance. Who are you to decide who looks more Hawai’ian? Who are you people to assume our culture and that this girl takes it more seriously than the others? Because she gets a backstory?
The amazing thing about my culture, MY culture, is that hula opens its arms to all. All children here are welcome to it. It is passed on to them and their blood does not dictate their passion nor their eligibility. “Lilo is there to make her mother proud, rather than to make friends and socialize”. Do you have any idea what a halau is? You don’t, no, none of you do. You have no idea what a halau is. A halau is your family, a halau are your friends, your only social circle when you are fully dedicated. My mother IS one of the queens of hula who trained under Maiki Aiu and she still talks to her hula sisters daily. They were part of her life. It isn’t enough to just hula, or learn it, and put blinders on the sides of your head. If you don’t live it with your hula sisters and brothers, then your story is nothing. You go through motions and you tell no stories.
Don’t try for one moment, to make that scene out like it was Lilo being bullied by a white girl. Yes, Hawai’i is still being raped by the ideologies of white appropriation, but do not for one moment think that these girls may not be Hawai’ian. Do not think for one moment that you have the right nor the knowledge to sweep onto the internet and start reposting like a fucking idiot about a culture and mixed bloodlines and races you don’t really understand aside from “the white man hurt them”. You damage people like my sister, like my cousins, all equally as proud and maka’a’inana as I, simply because they don’t look like me.
You have no right to use this scene as commentary, because you have not even a shade of an idea of the damage you do with it.



#Smackdown of epic proportions

fucking preach..

*boop*

sophiedoodlz:

disneyvillainsforjustice:

smallworldofbigal:

nerdfaceangst:

myfeelsarehurting:

rjthedetective:

draelogor:

feministsupernatural:

You know what makes me the saddest about Lilo and Stitch?

When she gets kicked out of the dance class, she’s the only person we know for sure is native Hawaiian in her age bracket in the class.

There’s Myrtle, who is white, Elena who is white (f she’s the blonde one), Theresa who’s background is unclear, and Yuki who is implied, based on the name and the large Japanese population in Hawaii, to be Japanese. 

She is taking a dance class of a dance traditional to her people.

And she is kicked out primarily because a white girl, Myrtle, is bullying her. 

How fucking sad is that?

Dude.

This always got me about the movie. I always

wanted

to punch

myrtle

IN THE FACE AND EXISTENCE 

Also, the hula dancing runs in the family, as we find out in the sequel that her mother was a dance champion. It’s clear in this scene that the deaths of her mother and father are still fresh in her mind and I think the dancing reminds her of her mother and happier times. Maybe they practiced together frequently? Idk, it’s just the vibe I get. That Lilo is there to do her mother proud, rather than to make friends and socialize like the others there.

Her face says it all. Look at how happy she is!

Everyone who liked this, everyone who validated this, you need to unlike it right NOW.

As a Native Hawai’ian, I have a problem with this post.

A fucking big problem.

First off, Hawai’i is massively diverse. Massively. Almost no one is pure Hawai’ian. The speculation that Lilo is at all pure or the only part Hawai’ian is laughable. There’s a very very slim margin that she would be at all. Secondly, just because it’s “not confirmed” doesn’t mean those girls aren’t. There are thousands of Japanese-Hawai’ian girls. Thousands, and thousands more of even more mixed races who are Hawai’ian. My sister is a shade away from blonde, and as pale as snow white, and she is just as half-Hawai’ian as I am - even though I look more “authentic”. I know many beautiful Hawai’ian girls with clouds of red hair and creamy complexions from mixed bloodlines. If you want to get “authentic” and go off of Lilo’s appearance, to us locals, she looks half-Asian. She looks definitely hapa at best.

It angers me beyond all reason that this has reposts, reposts from people who don’t understand the Native Hawai’ian culture, much less the culture that sprung from it which envelops our islands. You are reposting blind ignorance. Who are you to decide who looks more Hawai’ian? Who are you people to assume our culture and that this girl takes it more seriously than the others? Because she gets a backstory?

The amazing thing about my culture, MY culture, is that hula opens its arms to all. All children here are welcome to it. It is passed on to them and their blood does not dictate their passion nor their eligibility. “Lilo is there to make her mother proud, rather than to make friends and socialize”. Do you have any idea what a halau is? You don’t, no, none of you do. You have no idea what a halau is. A halau is your family, a halau are your friends, your only social circle when you are fully dedicated. My mother IS one of the queens of hula who trained under Maiki Aiu and she still talks to her hula sisters daily. They were part of her life. It isn’t enough to just hula, or learn it, and put blinders on the sides of your head. If you don’t live it with your hula sisters and brothers, then your story is nothing. You go through motions and you tell no stories.

Don’t try for one moment, to make that scene out like it was Lilo being bullied by a white girl. Yes, Hawai’i is still being raped by the ideologies of white appropriation, but do not for one moment think that these girls may not be Hawai’ian. Do not think for one moment that you have the right nor the knowledge to sweep onto the internet and start reposting like a fucking idiot about a culture and mixed bloodlines and races you don’t really understand aside from “the white man hurt them”. You damage people like my sister, like my cousins, all equally as proud and maka’a’inana as I, simply because they don’t look like me.

You have no right to use this scene as commentary, because you have not even a shade of an idea of the damage you do with it.

fucking preach..

*boop*